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Pode Files

Pode has an inbuilt dynamic file type of .pode, which allow you to write normal file but use PowerShell within them.

For view files the naming convention is just index.pode or about.pode. However for non-view files in the /public directory the convention is style.css.pode - which includes the files base file type.

Views

Using Pode to render dynamic view files is mostly just using normal HTML, but with the insertion of PowerShell - in fact, you could write pure HTML in a .pode file and it will still work. The difference is that you're able to embed PowerShell logic into the file, which allows you to dynamically generate HTML.

To use .pode files for views, you will need to place them within the /views directory; then you'll need to set the View Engine to be Pode. Once set, you can just write view responses as per normal:

Start-PodeServer {
    Add-PodeEndpoint -Address * -Port 8080 -Protocol Http

    # set the engine to use and render Pode files
    Set-PodeViewEngine -Type Pode

    # render the index.pode in the /views directory
    Add-PodeRoute -Method Get -Path '/' -ScriptBlock {
        Write-PodeViewResponse -Path 'index'
    }
}

Info

Any PowerShell in a .pode files will need to be wrapped in $(...) and each line must end with a semi-colon.

Below is a basic example of a .pode view file, which just writes the current date to the browser:

<!-- /views/index.pode -->
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Current Date</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <span>$([DateTime]::Now.ToString('yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss');)</span>
    </body>
</html>

Any data supplied to the view function when rendering .pode files will make them far more dynamic. The data supplied to view must be a hashtable, and can be referenced from within the file by using the $data argument.

For example, say you need to render a search page which is a list of accounts filtered by some query; then your basic server script could look like the following:

Start-PodeServer {
    Add-PodeEndpoint -Address * -Port 8080 -Protocol Http

    # set the engine to use and render .pode files
    Set-PodeViewEngine -Type Pode

    # render the search.pode view
    Add-PodeRoute -Method Get -Path '/' -ScriptBlock {
        # some logic to get accounts
        $query = $WebEvent.Query['query']
        $accounts = Find-Account -Query $query

        # render the file
        Write-PodeViewResponse -Path 'search' -Data @{ 'query' = $query; 'accounts' = $accounts; }
    }
}

You can see that we're supplying the found accounts to the view function as a hashtable. Next, we see the search.pode view file which generates the HTML:

<!-- /views/search.pode -->
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Search</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <h1>Search</h1>
        Query: $($data.query;)

        <div>
            $(foreach ($account in $data.accounts) {
                "<div>Name: $($account.Name)</div><hr/>";
            })
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

Remember, you can access supplied data by using $data

This next quick example allows you to include content from another view:

<!-- /views/index.pode -->
<html>
    $(Use-PodePartialView -Path 'shared/head' -data @{ 'Title' = 'Include Example'})

    <body>
        <span>$([DateTime]::Now.ToString('yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss');)</span>
    </body>
</html>

<!-- /views/shared/head.pode -->
<head>
    <title>$($data.Title)</title>
</head>

Non-Views

The rules for using .pode files for other non-view file types, like css/js files, work exactly like the above view files but they're placed within the /public directory instead of the /views directory. You also need to specify the actual file type in the extension, for example:

/public/styles/main.css.pode
/public/scripts/main.js.pode

Here you'll see the main extension is .pode, but you need to specify a sub-extension of the main file type such as .css - this helps Pode work out the main content type when writing to the response.

Below is a .css.pode file that will render the page in purple on even seconds, or red on odd seconds:

/* /public/styles/main.css.pode */
body {
    $(
        $date = [DateTime]::UtcNow;

        if ($date.Second % 2 -eq 0) {
            "background-color: rebeccapurple;";
        } else {
            "background-color: red;";
        }
    )
}

To load the above .css.pode file in a view file:

<!-- /views/index.pode -->
<html>
   <head>
      <link rel="stylesheet" href="/styles/main.css.pode">
   </head>
   <body>
        <span>$([DateTime]::Now.ToString('yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss');)</span>
    </body>
</html>

Escaping

Because .pode files are interpreted as PowerShell files, there will be times - especially for JavaScript/jQuery - when you'll run into parsing errors.

The bulk of the time it will likely be jQuery, where in something like the following:

$(document).ready(...)

the $(document) will try to be run like PowerShell, and fail because document isn't a command.

To fix this, you just need to use a back-tick (`) to escape the dollar ($):

`$(document).ready(...)

and Pode will now parse the file correctly.

Tip

If you're embedding JavaScript into a .pode view file, move the JavaScript into a separate .js public static file instead. This will save constantly escaping characters for non-dynamic JavaScript.

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