Skip to content

External

At most times you'll possibly be accessing your Pode server locally. However, you can access your server externally if you setup the endpoints appropriately using the Add-PodeEndpoint function. These will work on a your VMs, or in a Container.

Tip

In each case, ensure any Firewalls or Network Security Groups are configured to allow access to the port.

All Addresses

The default and common approach is to set your Pode server to listen on all IP addresses; this approach does require administrator privileges:

Add-PodeEndpoint -Address * -Port 8080 -Protocol Http

With this set, you can access your endpoint using the server's Public, Private IP address or VM name - plus the port number:

Invoke-RestMethod -Uri 'http://<ip-address|vm-name>:8080'

IP Address

The other way to expose your server externally is to create an endpoint using the server's Private/Public IP address; this approach does require administrator privileges. For example, assuming the the server's IP is 10.10.1.5:

Add-PodeEndpoint -Address 10.10.1.5 -Port 8080 -Protocol Http

With this set, you can access your endpoint using the server's Private IP address or VM name only - plus the port number:

Invoke-RestMethod -Uri 'http://10.10.1.5:8080'

Hostnames

Another way to expose your server externally is to allow only specific hostnames bound to the server's Private/Public IP address - something like SNI in IIS. This approach does require administrator privileges.

To do this, let's say you want to allow only one.pode.com and two.pode.com on a server with IP 10.10.1.5. There are two way of doing this:

  1. Specify the hostname/address directly on Add-PodeEndpoint:
Add-PodeEndpoint -Address 10.10.1.5 -Hostname 'one.pode.com' -Port 8080 -Protocol Http
Add-PodeEndpoint -Address 10.10.1.5 -Hostname 'two.pode.com' -Port 8080 -Protocol Http
  1. Add the hostnames to the server's hosts file (or dns):
10.10.1.5   one.pode.com
10.10.1.5   two.pode.com

Then, create the endpoints within your server using the -LookupHostname switch:

Add-PodeEndpoint -Hostname 'one.pode.com' -Port 8080 -Protocol Http -LookupHostname
Add-PodeEndpoint -Hostname 'two.pode.com' -Port 8080 -Protocol Http -LookupHostname

Next, make sure to add the hostnames into your hosts file, or into DNS.

With these set, you can access your endpoint using only the one.pode.com and two.pode.com hostnames - plus the port number:

Invoke-RestMethod -Uri 'http://one.pode.com:8080'
Invoke-RestMethod -Uri 'http://two.pode.com:8080'

Netsh

This next way allows you to access your server external, but be able to run the server without administrator privileges. The initial setup does require administrator privileges, but running the server does not.

To do this, let's say you want to access your server on 10.10.1.5, you can use the following steps:

  1. You server should be listening on localhost and then any port you wish:
Add-PodeEndpoint -Address localhost -Port 8080 -Protocol Http
  1. Next, you can run the following command as an administrator where the <external-port> can be any port that's not the port in your Add-PodeEndpoint (such as port+1):
netsh interface portproxy add v4tov4 listenport=<external-port> connectaddress=127.0.0.1 connectport=<pode-port>

For example, the above endpoint could be:

netsh interface portproxy add v4tov4 listenport=8081 connectaddress=127.0.0.1 connectport=8080
  1. Run your Pode server as a non-admin user.

With this done, you can access your endpoint on 10.10.1.5:8081:

Invoke-RestMethod -Uri 'http://10.10.1.5:8081'

This works by having netsh interface portproxy redirect traffic to the local port which your Pode server is listening on.

Back to top