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Tasks

A Task in Pode is a script that you can later invoke either asynchronously, or synchronously. They can be invoked many times, and they also support returning values from them for later use.

Similar to Schedules, Tasks also run in their own separate runspaces; meaning you can have long or short running tasks. By default up to a maximum of 2 tasks can run concurrently, but this can be changed by using Set-PodeTaskConcurrency.

Behind the scenes there is a a Timer created that will automatically clean-up any completed tasks. Any task that has been completed for 1+ minutes will be disposed of to free up resources - there are functions which will let you clean-up tasks more quickly.

Create a Task

You can create a new task by using Add-PodeTask, this will let you define a name for the task and set the scriptblock:

Add-PodeTask -Name 'Example' -ScriptBlock {
    # logic
}

A task's scriptblock can also return values, that can be retrieved later on (see Invoking):

Add-PodeTask -Name 'Example' -ScriptBlock {
    # logic
    return $result
}

Usually all tasks are created within the main Start-PodeServer scope, however it is possible to create adhoc tasks with routes/etc. If you create adhoc tasks in this manor, you might notice that they don't run when invoked; this is because the Runspace that tasks use to run won't have been configured. You can configure by using -EnablePool on Start-PodeServer:

Start-PodeServer -EnablePool Tasks {
    Add-PodeEndpoint -Address * -Port 8080 -Protocol Http

    Add-PodeRoute -Method Get -Path '/create-task' -ScriptBlock {
        Add-PodeTask -Name 'example' -ScriptBlock {
            # logic
        }
    }
}

Arguments

You can supply custom arguments to your tasks by using the -ArgumentList parameter. Similar to schedules, for tasks the -ArgumentList is a hashtable; this is done because parameters to the -ScriptBlock are splatted in, and the parameter names are literal.

For example, the first parameter to a task is always $Event - this contains the .Lockable object. Other parameters come from any Key/Values contained with the optional -ArgumentList:

Add-PodeTask -Name 'Example' -ArgumentList @{ Name = 'Rick'; Environment = 'Multiverse' } -ScriptBlock {
    param($Event, $Name, $Environment)
}

Important

In tasks, your scriptblock parameter names must be exact - including case-sensitivity. This is because the arguments are splatted into a runspace. If you pass in an argument called "Names", the param-block must have $Names exactly. Furthermore, the event parameter must be called $Event.

Invoking

You can invoke a task to run from anywhere, be it a route, schedule, middleware, or another task! To do so you use Invoke-PodeTask and this will either return the running task, or the result of running the task if used with -Wait.

Asynchronously

When you use Invoke-PodeTask with just the name of the task, this will trigger a task to run asynchrounsly by default:

$task = Invoke-PodeTask -Name 'Example'

# or

Invoke-PodeTask -Name 'Example' | Out-Null

The task will continue to run in the background even if, for example, the route you invoked it from as finished processing. Running tasks like this will be automatically cleaned-up once they've finished running for 1+ minutes.

If your task does some work, and then you want to run some extra logic while it runs, and then get some value back (or just wait for it do be done), you can use Wait-PodeTask:

Add-PodeTask -Name 'Example' -ScriptBlock {
    # do some work
    return $user
}

Add-PodeRoute -Method Get -Path '/run-task' -ScriptBlock {
    $task = Invoke-PodeTask -Name 'Example'

    # do some other work here, while the task runs

    $user = $task | Wait-PodeTask
    Write-PodeJsonResponse -Value @{ User = $user }
}

Synchronously

To run a task synchronously you use Invoke-PodeTask with the -Wait switch, and this will: run the task; wait for it to complete; clean-up the task; and then return any result:

Add-PodeTask -Name 'Example' -ScriptBlock {
    # do some work
    return $user
}

Add-PodeRoute -Method Get -Path '/run-task' -ScriptBlock {
    $user = Invoke-PodeTask -Name 'Example' -Wait
    Write-PodeJsonResponse -Value @{ User = $user }
}

Timeout

By default all tasks run for as long as they need until completion. You can set a timeout on the task by supplying the -Timeout parameter, in seconds, on Invoke-PodeTask or Wait-PodeTask. For example, to timeout a task running for longer than 5 seconds:

$task = Invoke-PodeTask -Name 'Example' -Timeout 5
$user = $task | Wait-PodeTask -Timeout 5

Setting -Timeout on Invoke-PodeTask when not using -Wait will set an expiry time on the task.

Clean-up

When you use the -Wait switch on Invoke-PodeEvent, or if you use Wait-PodeEvent, both of these will automatically clean-up the task immediately.

However, if you run a task async without waiting for it to finish, then it will be left running in the background. When this happens, Pode will automatically dispose of completed tasks after 1+ minutes.

You can force a task to be cleaned-up by using Close-PodeTask, and this will dispose and remove a running task regardless of completion status:

$task = Invoke-PodeTask -Name 'Example'
$task | Close-PodeTask

or, to cleverly clean-up early if the task has finished you can use Test-PodeTaskCompleted:

$task = Invoke-PodeTask -Name 'Example'

if (Test-PodeTaskCompleted -Task $task) {
    $task | Close-PodeTask
}

Script from File

You normally define a task's script using the -ScriptBlock parameter however, you can also reference a file with the required scriptblock using -FilePath. Using the -FilePath parameter will dot-source a scriptblock from the file, and set it as the task's script.

For example, to create a task from a file that will output Hello, world:

  • File.ps1

    {
        'Hello, world!' | Out-PodeHost
    }
    

  • Task

    Add-PodeTask -Name 'from-file' -FilePath './Tasks/File.ps1'
    

Getting Tasks

The Get-PodeTask helper function will allow you to retrieve a list of tasks configured within Pode. You can use it to retrieve all of the tasks, or supply filters to retrieve specific ones.

To retrieve all of the tasks, you can call the function will no parameters. To filter, here are some examples:

# one tasks by name
Get-PodeTask -Name Example1

# multiple tasks by name
Get-PodeTask -Name Example1, Example2

Task Object

Warning

Be careful if you choose to edit these objects, as they will affect the server.

The following is the structure of the Task object internally, as well as the object that is returned from Get-PodeTask:

Name Type Description
Name string The name of the Task
Script scriptblock The scriptblock of the Task
Arguments hashtable The arguments supplied from ArgumentList
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